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Q: Enjococado Sauce Recipe ( Answered 5 out of 5 stars,   0 Comments )
Question  
Subject: Enjococado Sauce Recipe
Category: Family and Home > Food and Cooking
Asked by: chedwards-ga
List Price: $10.00
Posted: 28 Sep 2004 16:37 PDT
Expires: 28 Oct 2004 16:37 PDT
Question ID: 407667
I would like to find the recipe for a Mexican Sauce called "Enjococado
Sauce".  Here is what I know of the sauce so far...Enjococado 100-Year
Old Family Recipe, it is  a sour cream-based sauce with
roasted guajillo chiles, special herbs and garnished with almonds.
Answer  
Subject: Re: Enjococado Sauce Recipe
Answered By: crabcakes-ga on 29 Sep 2004 00:29 PDT
Rated:5 out of 5 stars
 
Well chedwards, you are not alone in looking for this sauce! I found
several people searching for it!

I did some extensive searching when I stumbled upon the recipe below. 
 ?Enjococado? is often found in conjunction with chicken, or ?pollo?.
The word ?Enjococado? had me stumped, and I realized it is probably an
 evolution/transformation/misspelling  of  ?en Jocoque?  or
?enjocoque?. Later in my research, I found it is more than likely a
transformation of a Nhuatl (Aztec language) word ?xocqui"
[shoh-kh-kee], a Nhuatl word for rancid?, then ?Latinized? into the
Spanish form ?enjococado?

 Read this interesting tale of someone who tracked down this recipe!

?I was so honed in on finding this recipe...I searched until I came
across this wonderful little site on the web...It is a cooking school
way down in Mexico...I figured if anyone would know the recipe they
might (family owned and handed down for years recipes)...but also
thought they might not be interested in sharing it >>> I should have
known better cause I have found Mexican people to be so wonderfully
generous with sharing <<<< then I got to thinking this site had some
most interesting and original sounding recipes...I might enjoy going
there
on a vacation and learn to cook better at the same time...but will
need to wait until I can get on an airplane again <<<< very important
when travelling a couple thousand miles... I took a chance that they
might know the recipe...even if it be by another name (and it
was....kinda)...but never dreamed Doa Estele would answer me
herself...I mentioned that a bunch of us had been searching but
couldn't find a thing on it...I couldn't believe the extent to which
she went to get the recipe...not knowing if it would be what we were
looking for...I mean...Can you imagine travelling by Burro just to
help us?  Now that in itself gives new meaning to the word
"Gracious"...and that is what made me decide if I would ever take a
class it would be with Doa Estele and her family....If you browse
around the site it looks like it would be a blast to take her course
and have a vacation at the same time...If you go to the site mentioned
below or
(COMN) and click on Course you can see her and her most wonderful what
she calls kitchen and classroom....OMGOSH....I would love a kitchen
like that...
If you click on Mexcala it describes where the school is located....so beautiful...
And the Accommodations look so warm and homey...she even puts "Me Casa
- Tu Casa" which tells you alot about how gracious she is...

While you are at it you might like to take a 
peak at the Free Recipes....yummmmmmmm

http://www.mexicanhomecooking.com

Anyway...I sure hope this is close enough that any of you might be
able to tweak it into what you remember...who knows it might be the
exact recipe...Right? I remember a recipe that may be the one that you
want but did not have it complete in my mind. So I sent my nephew to
my grandmother?s town, which has no phone,to ask for the recipe. It is
not so far from here but there is no bus service and my nephew went by
burro. Burros go slower than e-mail and he did not return until
yesterday and now I have a recipe for you.?

So, drumroll??.
Here is the recipe:

===================================
Pollo en Jocoque (Chicken in Yogurt) 
4 to 6 persons


1 mandarina (a manarina is somewhere between 
an orange and tangerine and more sour)
1 orange (large)
3 large garlic cloves
3 green onions
2 -3 red poblano chiles
3 tbl olive oil
1 cup cooking oil
2 cups jocoque (jocoque is a type of yogurt 
that is close to "creme fraiche")
2 lb chicken pieces
1 cup sliced almonds (soak in hot water and 
remove skins)
Preparation:

1) Wash chicken and dry well
2) Char chiles over open flame or in frying 
pan and place in plastic bag for 5 minutes 
to sweat.
3) Remove from bag and remove charred skin, 
inside veins and seeds.
4) Heat cup of oil until very hot and fry 
chicken until done and remove from pan..
5) Remove remaining oil from pan, leaving 
chicken residue and add olive oil to same 
pan.
6) Chop garlic. onion, almonds and chiles 
and saut in olive oil until done.
7) Add chicken, orange and mandarina juice 
and cook for 10 minutes, stirring gently so 
as not to break up chicken.
8) Add jocoque and salt to taste (do not 
add pepper)

** you can add more juice or jocoque to 
taste as you play with the recipe

I hope that this is the one that you remember. It is from my great-grandmother 
and in any case it should be enjoyable.


http://food4.epicurious.com/HyperNews/get/archive_swap39101-39200/39146.html

Jocoque
A Mexican style sour cream. It has equal or less fat content than the
American sour cream. Some labels describe it as salted buttermilk, but
it is thicker; some call it a thin sour cream. The taste of jocoque
ranges from mildly tangy to refreshingly sharp.
http://www.day2daygourmet.com/glossary/terms_j.htm#jocoque
http://food4.epicurious.com/HyperNews/get/archive_swap39101-39200/39146/2.html
http://www.mozzarellacompany.com/cgi-bin/SoftCart.100.exe/scstore/p-gm8.html?L+scstore+mhos3797+1061057529

This may provide a clue to the history of the name ?jocoque, which may
be a Nahuatl word!
?But, the clue that provided an answer was a word that she used for
yogurt or what she called "jocque" (hoh-kh-keh). I recall that as
early as 1951, my mother would make jocoque by allowing milk to sour
in the icebox (fridge).? ?I discovered that jocque [hoh-kh-keh] was
an adaptation of "xocqui" [shoh-kh-kee], a Nhuatl word for rancid.
In our case, jocque came to mean milk, which was allowed to sour.?
http://www.longorian.com/013vshr.htm

?Also...they do sell Mexican Creme sold jars in the deli section next
to things like
Cotija Cheese at some supermarkets...I live in SoCal and can get it
most anywhere...it is very good...but I think the above make your own
is great...the name brand is El Mexicano and is shown at the URL
below...?
http://www.marquezbrothers.com/products.html

http://food4.epicurious.com/HyperNews/get/archive_swap39101-39200/39146/1/1.html

Here is a recipe for Enchiladas Jocoque
http://users.rcn.com/sue.interport/food/enchlads.html

?Enjococado sauce is their 100-year-old family recipe that's a sour
cream-based sauce with roasted quajillo chilis and herbs. Both of
these sauces are served over boneless chicken, on top of burritos, and
as enchilada sauces. The enjococado sauce is also topped with roasted
almonds.?
http://frank.hofer.us/FFF/2002/fdm2_112002.html

?Fick Bayless"Mexican Kitchen" again. Actually it's a basic guajillo
sauce you can do the rest on your own.?
http://www.chowhound.com/boards/general6/messages/10639.html

According to the site above, ?Enjococado Sauce? is a bacis guajillo
sauce. However, the ones below do not sound like it.

Recipe for guajillo sauce
http://www.pepperfool.com/recipes/sauces/essential_guajillo.html

Ready to mix Guajillo sauce
http://www.mexgrocer.com/4553.html

This cookbook has the recipe! The book is not available on Amazon.com,
or  on most sites in English, but you may find it in your library. If
not, ask your librarian about an inter-library loan. (Free)
http://www.unpaseoporloslibros.com/3.0/libro.asp?idlibro=84355
Amazon.com
http://www.amazon.com/exec/obidos/tg/detail/-/9706518851/qid=1096440735/sr=8-1/ref=sr_8_xs_ap_i1_xgl14/102-0188923-4332136?v=glance&s=books&n=507846#product-details

http://www.bookcost.com/prices/9706518851

Hope this helps you! If not, please request an Answer Clarification,
before rating. This will allow me to assist you further, if possible.

Come con mucho gusto!

Regards,
crabcakes

Search Terms
Enjococado
Pollo Enjococado
Recetas enjococado

Request for Answer Clarification by chedwards-ga on 29 Sep 2004 06:31 PDT
Thank you for the recipe in the previous answer.  I used to live in
Northern California and there were quite a few restaurants that served
Enjococado Dishes.  I asked if it had oranges in the sauce and if that
is what made the sauce an orange color and the answer was no.  I was
curious to know if you had found any recipes listed from those
restaurants...specifically Fiesta Del Mar in Mountain View, CA or Blue
Agave Club in Pleasanton, CA.
Thanks!
Chrissy

Clarification of Answer by crabcakes-ga on 29 Sep 2004 11:59 PDT
Hi again chedwards,

   I will put out some e-mails to restaurants featuring your recipe,
and post shoudl I hear back.

  Typically, restaurants do NOT share these recipes however, and the
recipe was NOT posted on any restaurant site. I scoured the internet
for almost two hours to find what I did! As you can see, others have
been seeking this special sauce as well.

  Give ma a day or two to see if I get any replies. In the meantime, I
believe your best bet would be trying the recipe provided, or checking
with your library for the book "Cocinar en Jalisco"
Release Date:
02 May, 2004
ISBN:
9706518851
Publisher:
Oceano De Mexico
Format:
Hardcover

Regards,
crabcakes

Clarification of Answer by crabcakes-ga on 30 Sep 2004 13:05 PDT
Hi chedwards,

  I received an e-mail from the folks who own Blue Agave Club, also
the owners of  Fiesta del Mar. This is their reply :

"Thank you for your interest in our Enjococado Sauce.  I am sorry, but
this is one recipe we do not share.  This is a recipe "invented" by my
husband's great-grandmother and is used by our 3  restaraunts as well
as by 3 other restaraunts owned by my husband's family members.  It is
very popular and we appreciate your understanding."



  I'm sorry I was unable to obtain the recipes from these restaurants.
Since these restaurants were not mentioned in your original question,
I was unaware, when I took this question, that you wanted recipes
specifically from Blue Agave Club or Fiests Del Mar.

  I'm hoping you will try the recipe I posted, substituting guajillo
chiles for the poblano chiles! (Both mention belonging to a "great
grandmother, and both call for almonds....sounds more than
coincidentally similar to me  :-)   )

You may find the recipe in the cookbook I mentioned as wellto be the
same or very similar to the one used by the restaurants!


Regards,
crabcakes
chedwards-ga rated this answer:5 out of 5 stars
Thank you for all of your help crabcakes...I will be sure to try the
recipe you found.
Thanks again!

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