Google Answers Logo
View Question
 
Q: meaning of squigly symbol in annals of legal speak ( Answered 5 out of 5 stars,   2 Comments )
Question  
Subject: meaning of squigly symbol in annals of legal speak
Category: Relationships and Society > Law
Asked by: grthumongous-ga
List Price: $3.00
Posted: 14 Jan 2005 08:18 PST
Expires: 13 Feb 2005 08:18 PST
Question ID: 457182
What is the meaning and pronunciation of the following symbol often
found in bills passed by Congress:



Does it mean section, subsection, schedule?
Depending on font the symbol may appear in slightly different conformations.
Answer  
Subject: Re: meaning of squigly symbol in annals of legal speak
Answered By: markj-ga on 14 Jan 2005 09:18 PST
Rated:5 out of 5 stars
 
grthumongous --

The symbol is the standard designation for "section" in federal and
state legislation.

Here are links to a couple of good sources, among many others, for
that piece of information:

"Citations to statutes and regulations look similar to case citations,
but you interpret them differently. A statutory or regulatory citation
includes a title or chapter number, an abbreviation for the code in
which the law appears, a section number, and, in parentheses, the
publication date of the code. The name of the law or regulation may be
included at the beginning of the citation.

Example: Children's Online Privacy and Protection Act of 1998, 15 USC
 6501 et seq. (2000).

Name of the law: Children's Online Privacy and Protection Act of 1998 
Title number: 15 
Abbreviated title of the code: USC, represents the United States Code 
Section number: 6501; the "" symbol stands for "section"; "et seq."
stands for "and the sections following"
Year: 2000"

U. of Washington: Legal Research Sources for Law in the Digital Age
http://lib.law.washington.edu/ref/digilaw.html



A New Hampshire attorney has taken the time to create a handy citation
guide based on the standard "Blue Book" (which is not available
online).  Here is the very brief relevant excerpt:

" section number 
There is one blank space between the section symbol and the number. ,  ,  , 
It is conventional to denote subsections with lower-case letters of
the alphabet. The second sublevel of organization uses numbers. The
third sublevel uses upper-case letters. The fourth sublevel uses
lower-case roman numerals. Enclose each level of organization in
separate parentheses. For example:
17 U.S.C.  102(a)(1)."

Legal Research and Citation Style in USA, by Ronald M. Standler
http://www.rbs0.com/lawcite.htm#anchor333333 



Search Strategy:

Since I have legal training, I knew the answer to the question, so I
spent my research time looking for some good sources, so that you
wouldn't have to take my word for it.

Here are two of the searches I used, among others:

statute symbol section
://www.google.com/search?num=30&hl=en&lr=&safe=off&q=+statute+symbol+section


law "stands for section"
://www.google.com/search?num=30&hl=en&lr=&safe=off&q=+law++%22stands+for+section%22



I am very confident that this is the correct answer, but if anything
is unclear, please ask for clarification before rating it.


markj-ga
grthumongous-ga rated this answer:5 out of 5 stars and gave an additional tip of: $3.00
thanks markj for the quick and thorough answer.

Comments  
Subject: Re: meaning of squigly symbol in annals of legal speak
From: markj-ga on 14 Jan 2005 09:37 PST
 
grthumongous --

You're quite welcome, and thanks for the stars and the tip.

markj-ga
Subject: Re: meaning of squigly symbol in annals of legal speak
From: probonopublico-ga on 14 Jan 2005 11:15 PST
 
Legal 'speak'?

Surely, legal WRITE?

I've never heard anyone SPEAK a Squigly.

Important Disclaimer: Answers and comments provided on Google Answers are general information, and are not intended to substitute for informed professional medical, psychiatric, psychological, tax, legal, investment, accounting, or other professional advice. Google does not endorse, and expressly disclaims liability for any product, manufacturer, distributor, service or service provider mentioned or any opinion expressed in answers or comments. Please read carefully the Google Answers Terms of Service.

If you feel that you have found inappropriate content, please let us know by emailing us at answers-support@google.com with the question ID listed above. Thank you.
Search Google Answers for
Google Answers  


Google Home - Answers FAQ - Terms of Service - Privacy Policy