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Q: hot tub while pregnant ( Answered,   0 Comments )
Question  
Subject: hot tub while pregnant
Category: Health > Women's Health
Asked by: joyland-ga
List Price: $20.00
Posted: 24 May 2005 10:34 PDT
Expires: 23 Jun 2005 10:34 PDT
Question ID: 525063
Here is the deal,

This is not a question if a pregnant woman should take a hot tub, we
know we should not! And we know about the temp of 100-101 being the
point where you should for sure not be there, and of course not more
then 10 minutes and etc.

The question here to you is:
My wife has already been in the hot tub; we knew she was pregnant, 5
weeks after conception! [7 weeks from period] and she went to the hot
tub twice when we were on vacation, one being like 101F and has been
there for 25 minutes at least.

She had a miscarriage 4 months ago [after having a healthy normal
pregnancy and delivering sweet little 1, 2 years ago without any
problems!]

Now she went to take u/s and she was told there is a little blood
clot, this happened after she went to the hot tub!!

She is not so concerned about that, since all the blood clot can do is
loosing a pregnancy is not going to throw her over, she his healthy,
so am I, will move on to the next!

What she is most worried, keeps her up at night, upset, and angry on
her self is: since she read on the internet about hurting the baby [by
taking damaging the development of the cord in hi temp.] and
especially between weeks 4-6

This is the little project for the researcher,

I know in Japan and lots of other countries woman take saunas and
steam rooms- [this is not as bad, as the body can sweat it out in
these places, or so I read] and there is places where woman take hot
tub with out any concerns [so I read on the internet]. I want you to
find me sources, perhaps in foreign language, [English would be even
better, but I couldn?t find in English] which talks about this
particular issue, and gives the point of view of those people who
don't take bat tub series! Or comforts after doing it..! and talks
about if you can find out if the baby was hurt ect. ect. all about it!

Also, are American doctors suggesting abortion in cases where the baby
might have been hurth with this kind of disorder/sickness?

Clarification of Question by joyland-ga on 24 May 2005 10:36 PDT
quote "many swedish and finnish etc. women
go on sitting in beastly hot saunas their whole pg's and
have perfectly fine babies? And how many japanese women
go on taking their steaming hot baths their whole pg's,
and... well, you get the picture. Not that those examples
are a reason to throw caution to the wind, but the point is,
you can take these things to real extremes, and sometimes
we don't do something out of that extreme caution that would
actually make life as a preggo MUCH easier, and benefit the
baby through us being calmer and more comfortable. Hot tubs
were a lifesaver for me in both my pregnancies, we just
turned ours down to about 100, and I lived in it the last
three mos.! It was the only place I was comfortable, and it
was just heaven. Weightless, no pressure points, no sciatica,
just pure comfort. It's not a whole lot of fun for other
people to be in at that temp, but oh well, THEY can go
take a 108 degree bath! By all means, just turn that tub down
and bliss out as much as you like."

Clarification of Question by joyland-ga on 24 May 2005 14:48 PDT
i need this answer asap, anyone?
Answer  
Subject: Re: hot tub while pregnant
Answered By: crabcakes-ga on 24 May 2005 17:37 PDT
 
Hi joyland,

  Some fetuses do suffer birth defects due to the mother using a hot
tub during pregnancy. The risk is not great, but medical professionals
recommend that pregnant woman refrain from using hot tubs and saunas,
or very hot baths for that matter. Keep in mind that this is a
recommendation, erring on the side of caution. Not every woman will
deliver a child with birth defects, or suffer a miscarriage, and some
women who have never used a hot tub will do the same. Just as you have
probably met people who say they have smoked or drunk liquor all their
lives and suffered no ill effects. However, people that do smoke and
drink are more prone to illness, cancer and early death.  There are
many things pregnant women are told to avoid, to decrease any risks,
even if they are unlikely.

  While the risk is small, the most common adverse effects blamed on
hyperthermia (an especially high body temperatures) are miscarriage
and neural tube defects. This is explained further down in my answer.
At 15-20 weeks of pregnancy, a pregnant woman can be tested for neural
tube defects, using a test called alpha-feto-protein (AFP). The
decision to abort the pregnancy would remain a decision of the
parents. Some of these defects are not as serious as others, and any
people born with a lesser form of spina bifida live normal lives.
Aborting a fetus is a very personal decision, and after testing, your
wife, you and the doctor can make such a decision. I have never heard
of an American docotor recommending that a woman terminate a pregnancy
for using a hot tub.

  Another consideration as to what you have read online is
reliability. You may read on a site that sells hot tubs/saunas that
there is no danger to pregnant women. Keep in mind that these sites
may have a bias and take their information with a grain of salt. The
sites  to which I have given you links are reliable sites, whose
information you can trust.

"Since caffeine may be linked to miscarriage and fetal growth
restriction, most doctors suggest limiting caffeine intake to 2 cups
of coffee or 3 soft drinks, or less, per day. Exercise is generally an
excellent idea during pregnancy, but very heavy exercise, for instance
running marathons, water skiing, and vigorously riding personal
watercraft may be unhealthy for the baby. Swimming is an excellent
all-around exercise during pregnancy. Hot tubs and very hot baths are
probably not a good idea during pregnancy, particularly during the
first few months. This is because excessive heat has been linked to
birth defects like spina bifida and anencephaly."
http://home.cfl.rr.com/dahmd/preconcept.htm

Finnish Women and Saunas
"If you are pregnant or suspect you may be, discontinue your sauna
use. Finnish women use their saunas, which don't throw heat as deeply
into the body, for only 6~12 minutes and reportedly leave at that
time, due to perceived discomfort. Their usage at this low level of
intensity is not linked to birth defects. Infrared Thermal System
usage may be 2~3 times more intense, and comparatively shorter 2~6
minute sessions hardly seem worth any minimal risk they may present."
http://www.holistichealthspa.com/infrared-benefits.html

Japanese women and saunas
"We advise pregnant women to not use facility for baby's safety." 
Perhaps Japanese and Scandinavian doctors have come to know the risks
now of hot tubs and pregnant women.
http://www.osento.com/services/about.html#things
http://www.osento.com/services/about.html

Some cultures use saunas and steam to help with labor. The risk of
birth defects has passed by the time the fetus is full term.
http://www.activebirthcentre.com/pb/wbusingabirthpool.shtml


"The tricky part is that neural tube defects can occur in an embryo
before a woman realizes she's pregnant. That's why it's important for
all women of childbearing age (15 to 45) to include folate in their
diets: If they get pregnant, it reduces the chance of the baby having
a birth defect of the brain or spinal cord.

"Adequate folate should be eaten daily and throughout the childbearing
years," said Elizabeth Yetley, Ph.D., a registered dietitian and
director of FDA's Office of Special Nutritionals.

Folate's potential to reduce the risk of neural tube defects is so
important that the Food and Drug Administration requires food
manufacturers to fortify enriched grain products with folic acid. This
will give women one way to get sufficient folate: by eating fortified
breads and other grain products, such as enriched pasta, rice, waffles
and cereal bars."


Other maternal factors also may contribute to the development of
neural tube defects. These include:

family history of neural tube defects

use of certain antiseizure medications

severe overweight

hot tub use in early pregnancy

fever during early pregnancy

diabetes


Any woman concerned about these factors should consult her doctor.
http://www.childbirthsolutions.com/articles/pregnancy/folatebirthdefects/index.php

"The March of Dimes recommends that pregnant women and women
attempting to conceive avoid hot tubs and saunas. A number of studies
have suggested that a body temperature of 102 degrees or higher during
the first four weeks after conception increases the risk of neural
tube defects, problems with closure of the baby's spinal cord or
skull. Besides steering clear of hot tubs and saunas, avoid exercising
strenuously on hot days. And contact your health-care provider if you
develop a fever over 100 degrees."
http://health.discovery.com/centers/pregnancy/americanbaby/pregsafety_02.html

"What effect does hyperthermia in early pregnancy have? Some studies
have shown an increased risk for birth defects called neural tube
defects (NTD) in babies of women who had high temperatures early in
pregnancy.

 Studies have suggested there may also be an increased risk for
miscarriage. Possible associations between high fever and birth
defects such as heart defects and abdominal wall defects have been
suggested. However, most studies did not find these results. The
potential risk for these problems is small. It is important to know
what caused your fever during pregnancy. Risks may be associated with
the cause of the fever, such as rubella infection, rather than from
the fever itself. Please discuss any concerns you may have with your
health care provider."

"What is a neural tube defect? Neural tube defects occur when the spine or
skull does not close properly. About 1 to 2 out of every 1,000 births
has a neural tube defect. An opening in the spinal column is called
spina bifida. The majority of babies with spina bifida grow to
adulthood. The most severe open skull defect is called anencephaly.
Infants with anencephaly have a
severely underdeveloped brain and usually die at or shortly after birth."
This is a cached page, meaning it may not be available much longer, If
you find this information helpful, I;d advise you to print it out.
http://66.102.7.104/search?q=cache:qLs1uLjkT1kJ:www.ctispregnancy.org/pdf/hyperthermia.pdf+birth+defects+%2B+hot+tubs&hl=en

"The March of Dimes recommends that pregnant women and women
attempting to conceive avoid hot tubs and saunas. According to them, a
 number of studies have suggested that a body temperature of 102
degrees or higher during the first four weeks after conception
increases the risk of neural tube defects, problems with closure of
the baby's spinal cord or skull." "Women were twice as likely to
suffer miscarriages if they took dips in hot tubs during the first 10
weeks of pregnancy, a survey of San Francisco-area women found.

The findings don't definitively link hot tub use to miscarriages.
Instead, they only imply some sort of connection exists. However,
study author Dr. De-Kun Li says that should be enough to keep newly
pregnant women -- and those who wish to become pregnant -- out of hot
tubs.

"It's a personal choice at this point, but why take the risk?" asks
Li, an epidemiologist with the Kaiser Permanente Research Institute in
Oakland, Calif.

Doctors have advised pregnant women against use of hot tubs and
whirlpools for some time. But previous research hasn't provided enough
information to give women with a firm recommendation about hot tub
use, Li says.

Researchers do know, however, that high body temperatures caused by
fever can lead to birth defects, especially those that prevent the
skull or spinal cord from forming properly."
http://www.rhtubs.com/pregnancy.htm

"The evidence for human teratogenicity from elevated maternal body
temperature, whether from fever or hot tub use, continues to
accumulate.[81,82] Retrospective clinical studies in women suggested
that maternal hyperthermia is teratogenic. In a review of 43 pregnancy
histories of women who gave birth to infants with meningomyeloceles,
three had fevers of over 102F (38.9C) between the 25th and 28th days
of gestation.[83] None of the 63 control subjects had fever during
this period of gestation. A significant increase in fever among
mothers who delivered infants with spina bifida has also been
found.[85] In a study of 23 retrospectively selected children who had
been prenatally exposed to temperatures of 38.9C or more between 4
and 14 weeks of gestation, similar patterns of malformations were
found including growth deficiency, CNS defects, and variable facial
malformations. In 6 of 23 cases, heat exposure was attributable to
sauna bathing or hot tub use, suggesting that hyperthermia rather than
an infectious agent was the teratogenic insult.

In a prospective follow-up study of 23,491 women who were screened by
serum a-fetoprotein or a-fetoprotein in amniotic fluid following
amniocentesis, Milunsky et al[88] identified 5566 women exposed to
either hot tub, sauna, fever, or regular electric blanket use during
the first trimester of pregnancy. Exposure to heat in the form of hot
tub, sauna, or fever was associated in all cases with an increased
risk for neural tube closure defects. Of the three, the adjusted
relative risk for hot tub use was the highest at 2.8 (95% CI , range
1.2-6.5). Electric blanket exposure was not associated with a risk for
neural tube defects. In another study of karyotyped spontaneous
abortuses, 18% of women who had euploid spontaneous abortions had
experienced a fever of 100F or more, compared with women with
aneuploid abortuses, of whom only 7.1% had febrile episodes.

Hyperthermia experimentally produces spontaneous abortion and
congenital defects in animals. Immersion of one uterine horn in water
of 40 to 41C for 40 to 60 minutes on the 8th to 16th day of pregnancy
in rats produced neural tube closure defects, other CNS anomalies, and
a high rate of fetal resorption.[91] In pregnant guinea pigs, exposure
to 43C external temperature for 1 hour daily was associated with
multiple fetal anomalies when the exposure occurred from the 18th to
the 25th day of gestation in 86% of fetuses. When this treatment was
performed before the 18th day of gestation, there was an equally
dramatic rate of fetal death and resorptions."
This site requires a free membership to read the entire article.
Copyright laws prevent me from posting the entire article.
http://www.medscape.com/viewarticle/410896_print

" The use of saunas and hot tubs that maintain a temperature greater
than body temperature should be avoided due to their potential for
causing overheating and possible effects on the developing baby.

Precautions
Avoid possible overheating. Check with your health care provider for
recommendations."
http://babies.sutterhealth.org/during/preg_precautions.html#Saunas%20and%20Hot%20Tubs

"Fifteen studies, reporting on 1,719 cases and 37,898 noncases, were
included in the meta-analysis. The overall odds ratio for neural tube
defects associated with maternal hyperthermia was 1.92 (95% confidence
interval = 1.61-2.29). When analyzed separately, the 9 case-control
studies had an odds ratio of 1.93 (1.53-2.42). The summary relative
risk for the 6 cohort studies was 1.95 (1.30-2.92)."

Conclusions: Maternal hyperthermia in early pregnancy is associated
with increased risk for neural tube defects and may be a human
teratogen.
http://www.epidem.com/pt/re/epidemiology/abstract.00001648-200503000-00010.htm;jsessionid=CT1IfBvwrLm1IGDNV5J5lMu3H76OUZHHssQgAvdUEFistqzdbF2Y!-1327733816!-949856031!9001!-1

"There's no evidence to suggest that heat impacts a woman's eggs, but
we do know that hot tubs and saunas aren't recommended during
pregnancy. Some studies show that raising your temperature during
early pregnancy increases the risk of birth defects. If you really
want to play it safe, skip the hot tub for now or limit visits to the
weeks just prior to ovulation."
http://www.babycenter.com/expert/preconception/gettingpregnant/1336309.html

"Kaiser Permanente researcher De-Kun Li, MD, PhD, found that women who
used hot tubs or Jacuzzis after conception were twice as likely to
have a miscarriage as women who did not.

"Based on our findings I would say that women in the early stages of
pregnancy -- and those who may have conceived but aren't sure -- might
want to play it safe for the first few months and avoid hot tubs or
any exposure to hot water that will significantly increase body
temperature," says Dr Li. "Although the finding is still preliminary,
it is prudent for women to take such precautionary measures to reduce
unnecessary risk of miscarriage."

The study, "Hot Tub Use during Pregnancy and the Risk of Miscarriage,"
found that the miscarriage risk went up with more frequent hot tub or
Jacuzzi use and with use in the early stages of a pregnancy.
Furthermore, among women who remembered the temperature settings of
their hot tubs or Jacuzzis, the study found some indications that the
risk of having a miscarriage may increase with higher water
temperature settings."
http://sheknows.com/about/look/2297.htm

"Pregnant women beware! Soaking in water above 102 degrees Fahrenheit
can cause fetal damage during the first three months of pregnancy
(resulting in the birth of a brain damaged or deformed child).
Pregnant women should stick to the 100-degree maximum rule."
http://www.cpsc.gov/cpscpub/prerel/prhtml79/79071.html

"A high body temperature has been associated with some cranial (head)
and nervous system birth defects.  The original studies looked at
women who used saunas.  Other studies have raised suspicion about
maternal fevers (temperatures at or above 102 degrees-F). It is
believed that the danger period is the early first trimester. The
general recommendation is to avoid raising the core body temperature
in the first half of pregnancy.  Recreational hot tubs are included in
the warning.  Tepid, bathtub soaks (101 degrees-F or cooler) are
probably not a significant cause of elevated core body temperature. A
good rule of thumb is that if you begin to feel warm or hot, your core
body temperature is rising, and you should get out of the heat source
and cool off."
http://www.abcbirth.com/dPreparingfor.html

"If you are pregnant or have heart disease, consult a doctor before
taking a sauna."
http://www.holistic-online.com/hydrotherapy.htm


"You Should Avoid Raising Your Body Temperature

      There is a potential danger to the developing fetus if your body
temperature rises above 102 degrees. You can raise your body
temperature to this level by getting a fever, by exercising too
strenuously, working outside on hot summer days, and so on.

 You Should Not Use a Sauna, Hot Tub or Take Long Hot Baths
      Hot tubs and hot baths have a tendency to raise your body
temperature and therefore are to be avoided. See the previous item for
details."
http://www.bygpub.com/natural/pregnancy.htm 

I can see no problem using a hot tub of 98-100 degrees near the end of
your pregnancy, if, and only if, your doctor clears it for you. S/he
is the only one aware of all your medical conditions and your
pregnancy.

I hope this answers all your questions. Please ask for an Answer
Clarification if any part of this answer is unclear. I will be happy
to assist you further, before you rate this answer.

Sincerely, Crabcakes


Fetal damage + hot tubs
birth defects + hot tubs
saunas + birth defects
neural tube damage + hot tubs
Japanese + pregnant + saunas
Swedish + pregnant + hot saunas

Request for Answer Clarification by joyland-ga on 27 May 2005 11:00 PDT
the point of this question was, so I can bring home some article and
findings by doctors, to my wife and calm her down, not to tell her
that she is now twice as likely to loose her pregnancy and that there
is chances she hurthed her baby! that I saw myself!
And I quote from my question;
"I want you to
find me sources, perhaps in foreign language, [English would be even
better, but I couldn?t find in English] which talks about this
particular issue, and gives the point of view of those people who
don't take bat tub series! Or comforts after doing it..!

Request for Answer Clarification by joyland-ga on 27 May 2005 11:01 PDT
you have worked on your research, it seems, however it did not point
me to what I was looking for. please clearify

Clarification of Answer by crabcakes-ga on 27 May 2005 11:37 PDT
Hi joyland, I'd be happy to clarify any missing points for you. Could
you tell me what it is that I missed, please? To my knowledge, I
covered all your concerns.

Let me know what is missing, and I will be glad to work on it for you!

Regards, Crabcakes

Clarification of Answer by crabcakes-ga on 27 May 2005 14:06 PDT
Hi again, Joyland,

   I've read and reread your clarification, and I think we have a
communication problem.

When you say "which talks about this particular issue, and gives the
point of view of those people who don't take bat tub series! Or
comforts after doing it..!"

Are you tlaking about a series of baths, or people who don't take bath
tubs seriously? I don't understand "Or comforts after doing it".

Did you want me to find medical article sthay say saunas and hot tubs are safe?

What i found was that they are not recommended for pregnant women. The
risk of miscarriage is not twice as likely, in fact no one knows for
sure. That is why it is best to be cautious and pregnant women are
advised to avoid hot tubs... to avoid any risk, no matter how small.

All the reliable medical sites I visited mention that there is a small
risk of fetal birth defects or miscarriage, but there are no hard and
fast numbers.

I also mentioned the SFP test your wife can have performed to see if
there are neural tube defects.

Please click on the links and read the entire article. I can not post
the entire article due to copyright restrictions.

If you stll feel I have not answered your question, let me know, and I
will ask the editors to remove my answer. This will open the question
up to other researchers.

SIncerely, Crabcakes

Request for Answer Clarification by joyland-ga on 30 May 2005 13:20 PDT
I was very clear in my question, I am not here to find an answer if 
should do it. I know I shoulden't and I have read it on the internet
all over myself. We did it already! Now my wife is very devastated, i
wanted to find some articles and studies that I can calm her with, and
that's why I asked to find forgein language resources, because I did
not find it myself in English!

I want to comfort my wife, nothing can be undone, now I want to find
some research to calm her with!

Clarification of Answer by crabcakes-ga on 30 May 2005 17:25 PDT
Hi joyland,

  You are asking me to find data that does not exist. The studies
indicate it is risky to use a hot tub while pregnant.

  I have given you articles stating the risk is low.

""The March of Dimes recommends that pregnant women and women
attempting to conceive avoid hot tubs and saunas. A number of studies
have suggested that a body temperature of 102 degrees or higher during
the first four weeks after conception increases the risk of neural
tube defects, problems with closure of the baby's spinal cord or
skull. Besides steering clear of hot tubs and saunas, avoid exercising
strenuously on hot days. And contact your health-care provider if you
develop a fever over 100 degrees."
http://health.discovery.com/centers/pregnancy/americanbaby/pregsafety_02.html

"What effect does hyperthermia in early pregnancy have? Some studies
have shown an increased risk for birth defects called neural tube
defects (NTD) in babies of women who had high temperatures early in
pregnancy.

 Studies have suggested there may also be an increased risk for
miscarriage. Possible associations between high fever and birth
defects such as heart defects and abdominal wall defects have been
suggested. However, most studies did not find these results. The
potential risk for these problems is small. It is important to know
what caused your fever during pregnancy. Risks may be associated with
the cause of the fever, such as rubella infection, rather than from
the fever itself. Please discuss any concerns you may have with your
health care provider."

"What is a neural tube defect? Neural tube defects occur when the spine or
skull does not close properly. About 1 to 2 out of every 1,000 births
has a neural tube defect. An opening in the spinal column is called
spina bifida. The majority of babies with spina bifida grow to
adulthood. The most severe open skull defect is called anencephaly.
Infants with anencephaly have a
severely underdeveloped brain and usually die at or shortly after birth."
This is a cached page, meaning it may not be available much longer, If
you find this information helpful, I;d advise you to print it out.
http://66.102.7.104/search?q=cache:qLs1uLjkT1kJ:www.ctispregnancy.org/pdf/hyperthermia.pdf+birth+defects+%2B+hot+tubs&hl=en

"The March of Dimes recommends that pregnant women and women
attempting to conceive avoid hot tubs and saunas. According to them, a
 number of studies have suggested that a body temperature of 102
degrees or higher during the first four weeks after conception
increases the risk of neural tube defects, problems with closure of
the baby's spinal cord or skull." "Women were twice as likely to
suffer miscarriages if they took dips in hot tubs during the first 10
weeks of pregnancy, a survey of San Francisco-area women found."

Please read the above articles carefully.

You may have explained this clearly, but I do not understand, and I
asked for your help in my last clarification. "When you say "which
talks about this particular issue, and gives the
point of view of those people who don't take bat tub series! Or
comforts after doing it..!"

Are you talking about a series of baths, or people who don't take bath
tubs seriously? I don't understand "Or comforts after doing it"." Can
you elaborate on what you are saying here?



"Miscarriage in early pregnancy is very common. Studies show that
about 10 to 20 percent of women who know they are pregnant have a
miscarriage some time before 20 weeks of pregnancy; 80 percent of
these occur in the first 12 weeks. But the actual rate of miscarriage
is even higher since many women have very early miscarriages without
ever realizing that they are pregnant. One study that followed women's
hormone levels every day in order to detect very early pregnancy found
a total pregnancy loss rate of 31 percent."
http://patients.uptodate.com/topic.asp?file=pregnan/5386


"Miscarriages reportedly occur in 20 percent of all pregnancies."
http://www.health-science-report.com/miscarriage/miscarriage-of-pregnancy/miscarriage-chances.html

About 20% of pregancies end in miscarriage in the average population.
According to my research, using a hot tub can increase this uo to 40%.
There is nothing I can do to change this.

In my opinion, your wife should have an AFP test drawn to see if there
are any neural tube defects present. That alone should ease her mind.
Them along with an ultrasound and a consult with her obstetrician
should be most calming.

You say "What she is most worried, keeps her up at night, upset, and angry on
her self is: since she read on the internet about hurting the baby [by
taking damaging the development of the cord in hi temp.] and
especially between weeks 4-6". I have well explained the effects of a
hot tub, and clearly stated it can harm the skull formation, and
neural tube defects, which include spina bifida. The hot tub does not
hurt the unbilical cord.

Your question states:  "I know in Japan and lots of other countries
woman take saunas and
steam rooms- [this is not as bad, as the body can sweat it out in
these places, or so I read] and there is places where woman take hot
tub with out any concerns [so I read on the internet]. I want you to
find me sources, perhaps in foreign language, [English would be even
better, but I couldn?t find in English] which talks about this
particular issue, and gives the point of view of those people who
don't take bat tub series! Or comforts after doing it..! and talks
about if you can find out if the baby was hurt ect. ect. all about it!

Also, are American doctors suggesting abortion in cases where the baby
might have been hurth with this kind of disorder/sickness?"

I have thoroughly covered the differences in hot tubs and saunas, and
I addressed the abortion issue.

I have asked for clarification to this line, which I do not
understand: "which talks about this particular issue, and gives the
point of view of those people who don't take bat tub series! Or
comforts after doing it..!" I do not understand this at all? Please explain.

It also appears that you and your wife are asking questions... some
parts of the clarifications seem to be from you, and some from her.

As for providing comforting and calming articles, I can't invent data
that does not exist. I wish I could, as I can see you both are very
upset. If something is risky, it is risky. I can't find an article
saying it is not risky, as all studies show it is.

Again, having the test and another visit with the doctor should allay
any fears you both have. Not sleeping and worrying constantly is also
not good for your child. Visit the doctor, have the test. If the test
is negative, and the ultrasound shows no skull deformities, you can
relax and enjoy your impending bundle of joy!

Please answer my need for clarificatrion, and I will see if I can find
anything else for you.

Sincerely, Crabcakes

Clarification of Answer by crabcakes-ga on 02 Jun 2005 11:44 PDT
Hi joyland,
  A colleague of mine, umiat-ga has kindly sent this link:


http://www.cyberbohemia.com/Pages/specialconcernswomen.htm
Note that it says steambaths are good for pregnant women. What it
neglects saying is it must be a short time period, as noted in my
original answer.


Remember, sauna heat is radiant, and does not heat the core body
temperature as does a hot tub.
"Pregnant women and children under five should avoid sauna use,
although in Finland pregnant women regularly use hot air saunas during
pregnancy with no apparent ill effects."
http://www.satori-5.co.uk/word_articles/alt_health/infrared_sauna_therapy.html

Hope this helps a bit more!
Sincerely, Crabcakes
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