Google Answers Logo
View Question
 
Q: In the UK does my employer have to allow me time off for a job interview? ( Answered 5 out of 5 stars,   4 Comments )
Question  
Subject: In the UK does my employer have to allow me time off for a job interview?
Category: Business and Money > Employment
Asked by: antipop-ga
List Price: $10.00
Posted: 08 Jul 2006 06:23 PDT
Expires: 07 Aug 2006 06:23 PDT
Question ID: 744350
In the UK does my employer have to allow me time off for a job
interview? I have an interview in two weeks time and would rather my
employer not know why I want time off. However, we are coming up to
crunch period on a project and they may refuse my request for a day
off unless I tell them it is for an interview.

Clarification of Question by antipop-ga on 08 Jul 2006 07:12 PDT
Updated question based on comments:

In the UK do I have to provide a reason to allow for time off? I want
time off for an interview but don't wish them to know that.
Answer  
Subject: Re: In the UK does my employer have to allow me time off for a job interview?
Answered By: answerfinder-ga on 08 Jul 2006 08:38 PDT
Rated:5 out of 5 stars
 
Dear antipop-ga,

No, the employer does not have to allow time off for a job interview,
and taking time off or annual leave would be dictated by your
contract, the Working Time Regulations, or varied by a trade union
agreement if that is applicable to you. The employer decides when you
can take annual leave. There is nothing I can find which states you
have to give a reason for applying to take a day off. However, here is
rather an impasse, the employer decides when you take annual leave, to
vary that you have to apply, and the supplying of a reason may help to
sway your case for a day off.

Worksmart is a TUC (Trades Union Congress) web site and they state the following,

?Am I allowed time off to attend a job interview?
Not normally. You will probably have to take it as annual leave, if
your employer does not offer a flexi-time arrangement which would
allow you to take some time out during the day. Of course, it might
not be the best idea to let your employer know you're looking for
other jobs by asking for time off for an interview in the first place.

Your employer may let you have time in certain circumstances, for
example if the interview is for an internal vacancy, or if you are to
be made redundant and they are helping you to look for another job.
This would be entirely at their discretion though.?
http://www.worksmart.org.uk/rights/viewquestion.php?eny=595

You can find links to further information on working hours, holidays,
breaks and leave on this page.
http://www.worksmart.org.uk/rights/viewsection.php?sen=15

This page sets out how much time an employee requires notice of the
need to take annual leave.
http://www.worksmart.org.uk/rights/viewquestion.php?eny=366

And this page shows that they do not have to grant it to you.
?Unfortunately, under the Working Time Regulations you do not have the
right to determine when you take your annual leave. The Regulations
enable your employer to require you to give notice, equal to twice the
length of the proposed holiday. Your employer does not have to agree
to your timing, although they must, at some stage in the holiday year,
allow you to take your entitlement.?
http://www.worksmart.org.uk/rights/viewquestion.php?eny=506


Rachel Lewis is a Work Rights Expert and she answers a similar
question on this page,
?There's no right to time off for interviews (except sometimes in a
redundancy situation). I generally think you're better off not telling
your current employer anything until the new job is all sorted out!?

?Rachel is an employment lawyer at London firm, Farrer & Co. She
advises employers and employees on all aspects of workplace rights,
including maternity, discrimination and unfair dismissal cases,
contract disputes and issues relating to working hours and pay. She
can offer advice on all of your work rights questions.?
http://www.ivillage.co.uk/workcareer/experts/lawex/qas/0,,228_594933,00.html

You may find this Guardian article of interest.
http://money.guardian.co.uk/workweekly/story/0,,1645616,00.html

I hope this answers your question. If it does not, or the answer is
unclear, then please ask for clarification of this research before
rating the answer. I shall respond to the clarification request as
soon as I receive it.
Thank you
answerfinder
antipop-ga rated this answer:5 out of 5 stars
Full and complete answer that left me in no doubt, very useful service!

Comments  
Subject: Re: In the UK does my employer have to allow me time off for a job interview?
From: probonopublico-ga on 08 Jul 2006 06:50 PDT
 
No!

The traditional method is to have a sickie.

Just get someone to phone in to say you are ill.

(I thought EVERYONE knew about 'sickies'.)
Subject: Re: In the UK does my employer have to allow me time off for a job interview?
From: canadianhelper-ga on 08 Jul 2006 07:05 PDT
 
You need to reword the question:

RE: In the UK do I have to provide a reason to allow for time off?
(since you don't want them to know it is an interview it is irrelevant
to the question).

I'll leave it to a UK based researcher but given that question I
certainly hope not (from an employer's point of view).

You could try calling:
http://www.employment-solicitors.co.uk/helpline.htm

0906 515 1585

8.00pm-11.00pm weekdays and 10.00am-5.00pm weekends

Calls are charged at 1.50 per minute. 

Service run by Landau Zeffertt Dresden Solicitors of 7 Dacre Street,
Broadway, London SW1H ODJ
Philip Landau is a specialist employment law solicitor
Subject: Re: In the UK does my employer have to allow me time off for a job interview?
From: antipop-ga on 08 Jul 2006 07:13 PDT
 
Cheers for the comments.

Yes I'm aware of 'sickies' but here's a novel idea, I don't want to have to lie! :P
Subject: Re: In the UK does my employer have to allow me time off for a job interview?
From: myoarin-ga on 08 Jul 2006 17:02 PDT
 
Then make a doctor's/dentist's appointment  - if that is possible in
the UK -  and don't keep it.  You can call in and cancel it after your
time off has been approved.

(If you can't prevaricate a little, you are too good for the business world.  ;-)

Important Disclaimer: Answers and comments provided on Google Answers are general information, and are not intended to substitute for informed professional medical, psychiatric, psychological, tax, legal, investment, accounting, or other professional advice. Google does not endorse, and expressly disclaims liability for any product, manufacturer, distributor, service or service provider mentioned or any opinion expressed in answers or comments. Please read carefully the Google Answers Terms of Service.

If you feel that you have found inappropriate content, please let us know by emailing us at answers-support@google.com with the question ID listed above. Thank you.
Search Google Answers for
Google Answers  


Google Home - Answers FAQ - Terms of Service - Privacy Policy