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Q: insulating container ( Answered 5 out of 5 stars,   2 Comments )
Question  
Subject: insulating container
Category: Science > Physics
Asked by: nemethise-ga
List Price: $40.00
Posted: 25 Aug 2006 19:02 PDT
Expires: 24 Sep 2006 19:02 PDT
Question ID: 759627
I am a college student. I live in an apartment which I rent with
several other people.

I need to use a nasal spray. It requires refrigeration. The problem
is, I share the refrigerator with 3 other people. I do not want to put
my spray in the common refrigerator.

I want to store the spray in my locker instead. However, I am not sure
how to store it.

Here are some of the ideas that I rejected:
1. Put it in an insulated bottle filled with ice. Problem: I need
something that can keep low temperature for at least 48 hours. I am
not sure whether ice will make it. Besides I do not know where to get
the ice. I could not find an ice machine that could fit into my
locker. I do not want to leave the ice machine in the apartment, since
I come there only to sleep.
2. Use an electric small travel fridge. Problem: even if I a find a
battery to use with it, it generates humming noise. I do not want to
put anything noisy into my locker.

I am looking for any other ideas.
Answer  
Subject: Re: insulating container
Answered By: journalist-ga on 25 Aug 2006 20:19 PDT
Rated:5 out of 5 stars
 
Greetings Nemethise,

If you don't mind keeping your medicine in your car part of the time,
you could easily use this car cooler. It plugs into the cigarette
lighter receptacle, and has a shoulder strap for carrying, so you
could take it to your locker very easily.  Size is 13" x 10" x 6 1/4"
http://www.autoanything.com/driving-accessories/69A1300A0A0.aspx

Here is another where it is offered
http://www.cetsolar.com/minicooler.htm

And here's a slightly different design - also note there is the option
to purchase an adapter for a standard socket, so with this one you
could easily keep it in your room, your car, your locker, and have it
for just about any outing.
http://tinyurl.com/s8cvs

********************************

Look into purchasing what the pros use, either semi-liquid ("low cost,
one-way use gel packs used for shipping perishables. Available in one
temperature formula.")or semi-solid gel packs ("modearate cost,
multi-use gel packs used for shipping perishables. Available in three
temperature formulas.") as described at
http://www.drypak.com/index.asp?cat=170361

Another professional refrigerant is freeze pack like those at
http://www.sorba-freeze.com/  They show at that page "Keeping your
chilled and frozen products below 5C for as long as long as 48 hours"

Proxy Ice at http://www.proxyice.com/freeze.htm 
"Unlike wet and dry ice, Proxy ICE Refrigerant Pads are flexible when
frozen. This lets you wrap it around your products, providing even
temperature throughout your package."

ThermaRite offers a few products along the same line - ThermaFreeze
and ThermaGard http://www.thermarite.com.my/

Ice Wrap
"Ice Wrap refrigerant blankets and pads are lightweight sheets or
blankets (rolls) which, when hydrated (soaked in water) and frozen,
produce an efficient refrigerant blanket (more effective than ice)
that keeps perishables cool during shipment and, when thawed, does not
release water into the package or the environment."
http://www.maxwellchase.com/IceWrap.php

Ice Brix
http://www.polar-tech.com/icebrix.htm

*********************************

If the above 'pro" products prove cost prohibitive, you could rotate
over-the-counter, flexible, freezer gel packs like those used for
lunchboxes and hiking.  I've a couple in my freezer that I use all the
time (purchased at Wal-Mart in the camping section - just about any
large store should carry them).  However, you'd need to do a
temperature test to see how long and at what temperature you'd need to
switch them out.

With either the professional or the over-the-counter variety, also
purchase a small, heavy duty, insulated sack/bag at a
hiking/backpacking store to further retain the coolness.

******************************** 


I don't recommend a dry ice storage technique unless you are EXTREMELY
careful.  You'd have to wear protective gloves and use tongs to handle
dry ice.

Should you have any questions regarding my answer, please request
clarification and I will be happy to respond.

Best regards,
journalist-ga 


SEARCH STRATEGY

portable refrigerant gel
refrigerant pads medicine
refrigerant pads food
freezer gel packs
car cooler lighter portable

Request for Answer Clarification by nemethise-ga on 26 Aug 2006 13:57 PDT
Thanks! That's exactly what I have been looking for!
Can all these pads be used multiple times?

Clarification of Answer by journalist-ga on 27 Aug 2006 10:00 PDT
Some of the styles can be used multiple times.  For instance, shown at
the DryPak link I provided above
(http://www.drypak.com/index.asp?cat=170361), there were styles that
were multiple use and multiple temperatures.  The link for those is
under the heading on that page "Semi-Solid Gel Packs" and leads to
http://www.drypak.com/2919/Gel%20Pack%20Refrigerant%20Size%20Guide%20I.doc,
where the sizes and temperatures are shown.  DryPak?s price quote
request form is located at http://www.drypak.com/index.asp?cat=62942

What I would do first is to visit a medium to large sized pharmacy in
your area, and inquire there about what type of packs they receive in
their shipments (one-time or multiple use). It may be that they do get
the multiple use packs, and simply toss them out, so you might be able
to acquire some there at a deep discount (or even free).  I would
think that your local pharmacist might also be able to assist you in
locating some of the packs from other area pharmacies.

With the portable cooler I mentioned at the beginning of your answer,
my thoughts on that were for you to use a combination of inexpensive
freezer gel packs along with the cooler.  This way, you?d have the
cooler running at home or in the car, frozen gel packs inside with
your medicine, and then you wouldn?t have to run the cooler while it
was inside your locker; the interior coolness of the unit, plus the
frozen gel packs inside, might allow the correct temperature to be
constant for extended hours while the unit is off.  Again, you?d need
to do your own temperature tests to verify the extended coolness.

I just did a bit more research and located another option. These are
called Techni Ice, and are also reusable ice packs.  Please visit
http://techniiceusa.com/english/ for more info.  This also looks like
a viable option for your needs.
nemethise-ga rated this answer:5 out of 5 stars
Excellent research.

Comments  
Subject: Re: insulating container
From: stanmartin1952-ga on 26 Aug 2006 00:13 PDT
 
Get a small locking box to put in the fridge, ie. a cashbox from WalMart.
Subject: Re: insulating container
From: journalist-ga on 27 Aug 2006 19:52 PDT
 
Nemethise, thank you so much for the 5 stars!  I'm delighted you are
pleased with my research.  :^)

Best regards,
journalist-ga

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