Google Answers Logo
View Question
 
Q: Painting tile in bathroom ( Answered 4 out of 5 stars,   2 Comments )
Question  
Subject: Painting tile in bathroom
Category: Miscellaneous
Asked by: ssam2001-ga
List Price: $20.00
Posted: 23 Jul 2005 21:18 PDT
Expires: 22 Aug 2005 21:18 PDT
Question ID: 547118
What is the best way to paint tile in a bathroom / shower so that it
doesn't peel off.  Can you simply use an oil based paint with a
primer? I had a painter paint tile in our shower with enamel paint and
it peeled off and now I want him to refund the money.  I need to show
a court that his using enamel paint was not only ineffective, but that
professional standards recommend against it.  If you can find a
credible source that will clearly state that this is not acceptable
and also specifies the correct way that would be very helpful.
Answer  
Subject: Re: Painting tile in bathroom
Answered By: crabcakes-ga on 23 Jul 2005 23:54 PDT
Rated:4 out of 5 stars
 
Hello Ssam2001,


   It appears that shower tile CAN be painted, but preparation of the
tile is the key, along  with giving the tile several weeks to
thoroughly dry. Cleaning and sanding first, using the proper paints
and sealants and time to dry are vital for a  successful shower tile
painting process.


?So you have ceramic tile in your bathroom, probably pink, and you
want to change the look on a budget?.. Can you paint the tile? The
answer is yes, but preparation is the key.
The consensus seems to be mixed when talking about painting the tile
in areas exposed to water. Some sources suggest that you should have a
professional resurface ceramic shower or bath tiles. If you have the
money, that might be the safest bet. However, other sources suggest
using the right products for adhesion. Of course, if you're tile is an
eye sore to begin with, what do you have to lose? It's up to you.?

1. If your tile is shiny, it is a good idea to lightly sand the tile
to helpwith the adhesion process.
2. Clean the tile surface! Use a 50/50 solution of household ammonia
and water. You can also use a mild acid solution used for tile/grout
cleaning. This can be found at home and tile centers.
3. Rinse well and dry thoroughly.
4. Prime your tile with a high-quality adhesion primer. (320-00 Aqua
Borne Blockout/Undercoater White or Zinsser's latex based Bulls Eye
1-2-3 Primer Sealer). (Note: if the tiles will be subjected to water,
use BIN or other alcohol based primers.)
5. After the primer is thoroughly dry, apply two coats of a
high-quality finish paint. (Note: for areas subjected to
water/moisture, use alkyd or oil based finishes.)
6. To keep the tiled effect, use a thin brush and re-create grout
lines or if you want to get creative, now is the time to add your faux
finishes.
7. Allow your paint to dry for approximately 2 weeks to insure that
the paint is scratch/scuff resistant. You don't have to avoid the
room, just use caution.
If you have re-painted your ceramic tile - we'd love for you to share
your photos or your tips/tricks!
http://www.homedecorresource.com/html/tips/paintingtile.htm 


?To assure a proper bond you must sand the tile very well. Use a very
fine (220-grit) aluminum oxide paper, which will remove the gloss
without leaving telltale scratches that would telegraph through the
new finish. For all but the smallest areas, use a power pad
(finishing) or random-orbit type sander. (One manufacturer, Zinsser,
claims that sanding is unnecessary when using its well-known bonding
primers, such as its water-based product Bullseye 1-2-3. Of course,
you can still sand as an extra precaution if you use this product.)?
http://doityourself.com/paint/paintceramictile.htm
?First, wash the surface to with a 50/50 solution of household ammonia
and water to remove soap films from bathroom surfaces or grease from
kitchen walls. I also recommend you wash with a mild acid solution
which is used to clean ceramic tile of excessive grout.  This can be
found in the tile section of most home centers,Ace hardware and tile
distributors.Rinse well with plain water, and let the surface dry
thoroughly.

Next, prime it with a high-quality adhesion-promoting primer like
Zinsser's latex-based Bulls Eye 1-2-3 Primer-Sealer. Bulls Eye 1-2-3
adheres tenaciously to ceramic tile, glass, and other hard-to-stick-to
materials.  The primer provides an "anchor" for the topcoat so it
can't be rubbed, chipped or scraped off easily.
If the area is going to be subjected to a lot of water such as the
tile in the tub area, use BIN an alcohol base primer for maximum
durability.
Follow the primer with one or two coats of a high-quality finish
paint. In moisture-prone areas alkyd (oil base)finishes are preferred,
as they provide a harder finish than water-base paints and are more
washable and durable. There are also several epoxy coatings that are
excellent for durability, check with your local paint store for
availability.
If you want to paint the grout a contrasting color, you can go back
over it with an artist's brush.
Your finished project will be fully cured in appx 2-3 weeks and you
should avoid harsh abrasive cleaning agents,  soft scrub is a good
general cleaner for painted surfaces.
Zinsser's Bulls Eye 1-2-3 Primer-Sealer can be found paint stores,
hardware stores, and home centers across the country. For more
information, visit Zinsser's  web site.?
http://alsnetbiz.com/homeimprovement/faq3.html


?The problem with painting on ceramic tiles, and painting on glass is
simply that the surface is too shiny to get ordinary paints to stick
and they peel off in no time. However, with a proprietary priming
paint this problem is overcome. Ordinary paints can be applied over
this primer.?
?The tile primer should then be applied in an even coat and left to
dry for 24 hours if possible. The surface should then be very lightly
sanded down, dusted and completely cleaned.
Paint should then be applied in two, thin and even layers. Allowing at
least 6 hours between coats (read manufacturers instructions) and
rubbed down very lightly with sandpaper in between. Two thin layers
are much better than one, thick one.
?The tile primer should then be applied in an even coat and left to
dry for 24 hours if possible. The surface should then be very lightly
sanded down, dusted and completely cleaned.
Paint should then be applied in two, thin and even layers. Allowing at
least 6 hours between coats (read manufacturers instructions) and
rubbed down very lightly with sandpaper in between. Two thin layers
are much better than one, thick one.?
http://www.diydoctor.org.uk/projects/painting_ceramic_tiles.htm


?Almost anything can be painted if it is properly prepared and sealed.
Sand, prime with a good primer, paint using 100% acrylic paint. I only
use top coats and sealers from      
http://boards.diynetwork.com/eve/ubb.x/a/tpc/f/6821916776/m/1571037512
http://www.aquafinishing.com/

?For example, if it is in the shower, the strongest method is to use a
2-part epoxy developed just for this application. In light-duty areas,
such as backsplash, you can simply rough the tile by wetsanding with
automotive sandpaper, and then applying a commercial primer before
painting with you choice of paint. If you want a high-gloss sheen,
similar to actual tile, then consider using a spray setup and
automotive paint.?
http://www.remodel-house.com/articles/howtopainttile.htm

This page says this is NOT for shower tiles, but gives you an idea of
what you should use if doing so:
?Priming:
	apply a high adhesion alcohol-based or oil-based (alkyd) stain
blocking primer that is recommended foe interior tile surfaces
	wear eye protection, rubber gloves and an appropriate respirator
while applying the primer; use ample ventilation
	allow the primer to dry over night before painting
	do not leave a primer unpainted
c. Painting:
	for bathroom and kitchen walls and counter backs, use a quality
latex kitchen & bath paint in a satin, semigloss or gloss finish; or a
top line interior latex paint in eggshell, satin, semigloss or gloss
finish
	for floors, use a latex satin finish floor paint that is recommended
for interior use on primed tile; or a semigloss oil-based or
polyurethane floor paint recommended for use on primed tile?
http://www.divatribe.com/articles/how-to/painting_ceramic_tiles.html

?f you find painted tile, strip the paint from it with a homemade
paste. Combine TSP (trisodium phosphate), powdered calcium carbonate
(sometimes called whiting), and water. TSP and calcium carbonate are
available at most paint stores or pharmacies. Mix 1 part TSP with 2
parts calcium carbonate, and add water until the mixture reaches the
consistency of thick paste. Using a putty knife, apply the paste to
the tile, about 3/8 inches thick. Let the paste sit on the tile about
30 minutes for best results. Then scrape off the residue with a
plastic putty knife, which won't scratch the glazed tile. Rinse the
tile immediately and thoroughly with warm water. For this procedure,
wear gloves, use eye protection, and make sure ventilation is
adequate.?
http://www.bhg.com/bhg/story.jhtml?storyid=/templatedata/bhg/how-to/data/14574.xml&catref=bcat36


From Home Improvement Forums:

I believe the writer below meant TSP (TriSodiumPhosphate) and not STP.
?I've painted two shower stalls that get water on a regular basis and
they've held up well. The trick to painting tile is the products you
use, and the prep. You have to clean the tile well with something like
STP(your paint store will have what you need to wash it with). It
needs to be scuffed up with a sanding(no you don't have to take the
shiny surface off the old tile, just scuff it). You *have* to prime it
with a high adhesion primer(your paint store will have it).
You can then paint it with whatever you want for a finish. You can buy
"glass finish" paint if you want it to be real shiny.

I was really pleased with the way mine turned out. You will be
painting over any grout when you paint the tile, but it is a cost
effective way to change the look of the tile. I did not mind the look
of the grout painted over at all, in fact I think I like it better.?
http://www.thenewhomemaker.com/node/6314


?Glidden makes a paint that can be used on ceramic tiles. One is a
latex and one is a oilbase paint. Jammer is one of the names. Home
Depot carries these. The only concern would be if they are in a
shower. So yes you can paint them. Good luck with your project.? 
http://www.improvenet.com/HomeOwner/AdviceandResources/MessageBoard/message.html?id=83374


?The products available at the home improvement centers are very poor
quality. For the mess, cost and quality issues, it's much cheaper and
easier to invest a couple hundred dollars into an acrylic reliner and
wall panels. They look very nice, are much easier to install, and the
quality can't be beat. It's a 1 day project and 2 people can do it
with basic tools. Here's a link that will give you more info on it.?
http://www.nationaltubliner.com/

http://community.discovery.com/eve/ubb.x/a/tpc/f/4151912904/m/591108395



?If I were you, I'd buy the smallest can of recommended paint you can
find, and some 120-grit silicone carbide wet/dry sandpaper. Wet a
6-inch x 6-inch area on the shower floor, then sand the spot to
roughen it slightly. Rinse well, then dry this test patch completely
before applying two or three coats of paint in that one place. Use the
shower for a month or so and see how the paint wears. If it resists
scratching, then prepare and paint the entire shower unit with
confidence. If not, then install a new shower stall, ending the 1970s
nightmare once and for all.?
http://www.homeenvy.com/db/9/529.html

Then again, some people do not recommend painting shower tiles!

?Question:
I would like to paint a mural on a wall of ceramic tile and need to
know what kind of paint and sealer to use?

Answer:
This has to be done and fired prior to installation if it is in a
shower or heavy use area. You can paint murals on the other walls with
product purchased from your local ceramic shop.?

?True Value has a home project for painting wall tile. My home is 23
years old and the tile on the bathroom floor is (I'm guessing) 1" x 1"
tile. I would like to try painting it as suggested below. Will this
work for floor tile?: Paint Ceramic Tile Level of difficulty:
Intermediate If you've grown tired of the look of your ceramic tile or
you're changing your decor, painting can save the expense of tiling
over the existing tile or replacing it. While you should certainly
leave painting ceramic tile shower and tub walls to the specialists
(see your telephone directory under "Bathtub Refinishing" or
"Appliance Refinishing"), you can repaint ceramic wall tile yourself
in a half bath, kitchen, or other room provided that the tile is not
directly exposed to water and is still in good condition. The key to
success is very careful preparation and using the right primer and
paint.?

?If you've grown tired of the look of your ceramic tile or you're
changing your decor, painting can save the expense of tiling over the
existing tile or replacing it. While you should certainly leave
painting ceramic tile shower and tub walls to the specialists (see
your telephone directory under "Bathtub Refinishing" or "Appliance
Refinishing"), you can repaint ceramic wall tile yourself in a half
bath, kitchen, or other room provided that the tile is not directly
exposed to water and is still in good condition. The key to success is
very careful preparation and using the right primer and paint.?
http://www.truevalue.com/index.cfm?Action=expertsViewQuestion&intExpertID=23&intQuestionID=4593&CFID=37887901&CFTOKEN=39b5d2c-00889de3-9ae0-455d-8423-09d967f9b43b

The UK carries a product intended for tiles
http://www.dulux.co.uk/webapp/wcs/stores/servlet/PracticalitiesProductDetailsControllerCmd?storeId=10752&catalogId=10051&langId=-1&code=RTP


Additionally, calling one of these tile artists may be able to give
you more information.
http://www.homeexpo.com/HE/t1208.htm

http://www.customarttile.com/custompaintedtiles.html

I hope this answer contains the information you were seeking. If any
part is uncelar, please request an Answer Clarification, before
rating, and I will be glad to   assist you further, if possible.

Regards, Crabcakes


Search Terms
=============
paint +  shower tile
Painting shower tiles
Painting ceramic tiles
ssam2001-ga rated this answer:4 out of 5 stars
Very good answers.

Comments  
Subject: Re: Painting tile in bathroom
From: monroe22-ga on 24 Jul 2005 08:23 PDT
 
ssam2001:  Crabcakes gave a long and well-researched answer. However:
I have 48 years experience in the coatings industry, including 30
years of formulating paints. My comment would be: FORGET IT. It is
possible to paint ceramic tile in a manner that resists water, but
odds are against it and it involves much tedious labor. Either replace
the tile, or as a second choice, have a professional with experience
in this technique do the refinishing. If you can't afford either, live
with the problem.
Regards, monroe22
Subject: Re: Painting tile in bathroom
From: tubtech-ga on 11 Aug 2005 20:17 PDT
 
I Must say I am in agreement with Monroe22-ga. I have been painting
tile and tubs also known as refinishing for 20 years. The comments I
have seen above have made me cringe I can hardly take it. First of all
Sanding Shiny tile to a point where it etches to a degree to establish
a mechanical bond is almost impossible. It needs to be chemically
Etched. NOT EVEN MURIATIC ACID STRAIT is strong enough to etch tile
properly for a mechanical bond. Also NO OIL BASED PAINT or WATER BASED
PAINT or DIY KIT is going work. Even if you use the correct acid etch
you will need to neutralize the surface to establish the right PH
value of the substrate. The surface must be prepared correctly then
primed with a product which is made for surfaces that are to be
immersed 24-7. After that kind of primer is dry you can use an
ALIPHATIC ACRYLIC URETHANE 2 Part Mix and Spray it on. However, if you
dont have the proper breathing equipment and ventilation system then
you might as well drink Cyabnide.

The fact is the only coatings which will work are hazardous and
contain Cyanide. Most Solvent paints even the two part DIY kits will
contain Cyanide. IF THEY DIDN'T, the coatings would never harden up.
This is why professional refinishers are trained in handling, and
spraying, and controlling the enviorment they are working in.

Bottom line is this. 3 Months ago we refinished a whole shower tile
bath for a customer. They had estimates for $20,000. We were able to
professional do it for about 80 % less in 2 days. WHEN YOUR DIY
project fails and it will, you will have to chemically strip the tile
in order to have it done right or ripp it out. IF YOU ARE SAVING 80 %
by having a professional do it why would you even consider a DIY
PROJECT.
http://www.refinishersonline.com


================================================================================
This fact sheet answers the most frequently asked health questions
about cyanide. For more information, you may call the ATSDR
Information Center at 1-888-422-8737. This fact sheet is one in a
series of summaries about hazardous substances and their health
effects. This information is important because this substance may harm
you. The effects of exposure to any hazardous substance depend on the
dose, the duration, how you are exposed, personal traits and habits,
and whether other chemicals are present.
 

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------
 
HIGHLIGHTS: Exposure to high levels of cyanide harms the brain and
heart, and may cause coma and death. Exposure to lower levels may
result in breathing difficulties, heart pains, vomiting, blood
changes, headaches, and enlargement of the thyroid gland. Cyanide has
been found in at least 471 of the 1,647 National Priorities List sites
identified by the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA).

Important Disclaimer: Answers and comments provided on Google Answers are general information, and are not intended to substitute for informed professional medical, psychiatric, psychological, tax, legal, investment, accounting, or other professional advice. Google does not endorse, and expressly disclaims liability for any product, manufacturer, distributor, service or service provider mentioned or any opinion expressed in answers or comments. Please read carefully the Google Answers Terms of Service.

If you feel that you have found inappropriate content, please let us know by emailing us at answers-support@google.com with the question ID listed above. Thank you.
Search Google Answers for
Google Answers  


Google Home - Answers FAQ - Terms of Service - Privacy Policy